December 2018 Health Newsletter

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DELRAN CHIROPRACTIC, PA

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   Dr Richard Polino DC, DACNB, FICC
   Dr Jason Polino   DC
   Dr John Sinibaldi DC
         A Holistic Health Care Center
         www.polinowellness.com
         www.delrandiscdr.com

856-461-6262  
3001 Bridgeboro Road

DELRAN, NEW JERSEY, 08075



Current Articles

» ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
» Did You Know Your Tension-Type Headache Might Originate in Your Back?
» Too Much Food Variety in Your Diet Can Lead to Unhealthy Eating

ALPHA LIPOIC ACID
Alpha-Lipoic Acid

What is alpha-lipoic acid? Why do we need it?

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant manufactured in the body. It is sometimes referred to as the ?universal? antioxidant because, unlike most antioxidants, it is soluble in both fat and water. In addition to being manufactured by the body, it can be found in some foods and supplements (see below).

ALA has several benefits, particularly for people with diabetes. It enhances glucose uptake in people with type-2 diabetes, inhibits the process of glybosylation (in which sugar molecules attach themselves to proteins), and can reduce nerve damage and pain caused by diabetes. Preliminary evidence suggests that ALA can improve visual function in people with glaucoma. Test-tube studies show that ALA can stop the HIV virus from replicating, but whether ALA supplements can help people infected with HIV remains unclear at this point.

How much alpha-lipoic acid should I take?

As of this writing, there is no clear evidence that any particular dose of ALA provides a benefit for any particular condition. In the abovementioned glaucoma study, researchers provided subjects with 150 mg of ALA per day. Other studies typically use between 750 and 800 mg per day. Some practitioners recommend 20-50 mg of alpha-lipoic acid daily to provide general antioxidant protection.

What are some good sources of alpha-lipoic acid? What forms are available?

Small amounts of alpha-lipoic acid are produced naturally by the body. Some red meats ? particularly liver ? are believed to be good sources of ALA; supplements are also available.

What can happen if I don't get enough alpha-lipoic acid? What can happen if I take too much? Are there any side-effects I should be aware of?

Because alpha-lipoic acid is produced naturally in the body, deficiencies are not known to occur in humans. However, for people who take large doses of ALA supplements, some side-effects may occur, including skin rash, and diabetics run the risk of suffering hypoglycemia. Long-term use of alpha-lipoic acid in animals has been shown to interfere with the actions of the vitamin biotin, but research on humans has yet to be conducted.

As always, make sure to consult with a licensed health care provider before you begin taking alpha-lipoic acid or any other herbal remedy or dietary supplement.


References

  • Busse E, Zimmer G, Schorpohl B, et al. Influence of alpha-lipoic acid on intracellular glutathione in vitro and in vivo.Arzneimittelforschung1992;42:829-31.
  • Filina AA, Davydova NG, Endrikhovskii SN, et al. Lipoic acid as a means of metabolic therapy of open-angle glaucoma.Vestn Oftalmol1995;111:6-8.
  • Lykkesfeldt J, Hagen TM, Vinarsky V, et al. Age-associated decline in ascorbic acid concentration, recycling, and biosynthesis in rat hepatocytes - reversal with (R)-alpha-lipoic acid supplementation.FASEB J1998;12:1183-9.
  • Nichols TW Jr. Alpha-lipoic acid: biological effects and clinical implications.Altern Med Rev1997;2:177-83.
  • Packer L, Witt EH, Tritschler HJ. Alpha-lipoic acid as a biological antioxidant.Free Radic Biol Med1995;19:227-50.

Author: Nichols
Source: TYH
Copyright: TYH 1997


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Did You Know Your Tension-Type Headache Might Originate in Your Back?

If you are an office worker, you might find yourself prone to tension-type headaches. These tension headaches can be dull, or throbbing, and make it hard for you to concentrate on your work. But why do you get them? Did you ever consider just how these headaches happen? Is it just general “stress”? Or is it something more?

The Relationship Between Tension Headaches and Your Back
It turns out that tension-type headaches may actually have something to do with the muscles in our back. Specifically, one study found that tenderness in the trapezius muscles was correlated with tension-type headaches in female office workers. (We can assume that this is similar for male office workers, as well.) If you look at a picture of the trapezius muscles, this connection makes a lot more sense. The trapezius muscles, or “traps” for short, are muscles that lay along the spine at the top part of the back. They fan out like diamonds, stretching up into your neck and down into the midsection of the back. Spending a lot of time hunched over a desk or peering into a computer most likely puts stress on these muscles as the head is tilted forward too much in what is called “forward head posture.” These muscles connect to the muscles of the head and face, encouraging stress and pain.

Chiropractic Care for Tension-Type Headache
Fortunately, we have a way to safely treat these headaches through expert chiropractic care. Contact us today for a consultation!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. July–Aug, 2018. Vol 41, Issue 6, Pages 483–487.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Too Much Food Variety in Your Diet Can Lead to Unhealthy Eating

The American Heart Association (AHA) is now questioning the assumption that eating a diverse array of foods is good for your health. This has been a diet recommendation for years, but doctors and nutritionists don’t agree on what an "array" or "variety" of food means. In fact, including a wide variety of food in your diet may actually be unhealthy. According to new studies, diversity in food choices is tied to poor diet, including eating refined sugars and grains, processed food, and sugar-laden drinks. Doctors once recommended getting a variety of food in your diet because it helps you get all the vitamins and nutrients you need. However, with the rise of cheap junk food and its availability, people are confusing variety with quality. The AHA Behavioral Change for Improving Health Factors Committee reviewed fairly recent studies on the topic of food variety in the diet, including its impact on obesity and eating patterns. Overall, they came to the conclusion that diversity in the diet doesn't necessarily connect to healthy habits. In fact, they discovered evidence suggesting that eating a wider variety of foods is tied to eating more food in general, poor eating habits, and gaining weight. Instead, researchers promote eating a large variety of healthy foods, including whole grains, veggies, and fruits.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online August 9, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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